Not A Four Leaf Clover

Four leaf clover is not a shamrock

Four leaf clover not a shamrock

The four-leaf clover is often confused with the shamrock. While the four-leaf clover is a symbol of good luck, the three-leafed shamrock is mainly an Irish Christian symbol of the Holy Trinity and has a different significance.

The shamrock is found all over the countryside in Ireland. St. Patrick went to Ireland to convert them to Christianity. In his teachings of God, he used the shamrock to represent the Father, Son and Holy Trinity. The three leaf on a shamrock is sometime associated with love, faith and love. The 4-leaf clover is an uncommon variation of the common, three-leaved clover. The fourth leaf which is smaller that the three leaves is luck. The four-leaf is a mutation and is quite rare, occurring once in about 10,000 specimens. According to tradition, such leaves bring good luck to their finders, especially if found accidentally.

Four leaf clover has become one of the most well known good luck charm and lucky symbol around the world and across many very different cultures. Many myths are associated with four leaf clovers. If you find a four leaf clover you can consider yourself very lucky indeed. According to legend when Adam and Eve left the Garden of Eden,  Eve was holding a four leaf clover. Clovers can also have five, six, or more leaves, but these are more rare. The most ever recorded is twenty-one, a record set in June 2008 by the same man who held the prior record and the current Guinness World Record of eighteen. Unofficial claims of discovery have ranged as high as twenty-seven. If you find a four leaf clover you can consider yourself very lucky indeed.The mystique of the four leaf clover continues today, since finding a real four leaf clover is still a rare occurrence and omen of good luck.


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One response to “Not A Four Leaf Clover

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